Online identities

In the last couple of weeks , my list of friends on Facebook has kept growing steadily, a couple of new friends every day. Unfortunately , that’s not because I have been making a ton of new friends in my new city. It all started waking up one morning and finding a friend request from L., someone who I supervised until a month ago or so, during my last mission.

Since my poorly-timed coming out in Uganda, I have had a very strict rule on never adding people I work with on Facebook, or at least that’s what I would say to anyone who asked me for my contact details. In reality, I have had a very strict rule about not adding anyone who does not already know I’m gay. It’s an imprecise science and one that has become more and more difficult with the proliferation of social media platforms and services. Back in the Uganda days, all I needed to worry about was indeed Facebook. My girlfriend at the time changed her name so that she wouldn’t have to “hide” on her profile. That seemed a little extreme to me so I opted for caution in what I posted, avoiding any references to my sexual orientation. It wasn’t that hard since I knew about two gay people at the time and I tended to see them every day. On the day that David Kato, a prominent Ugandan gay activist was killed, I remember raging and feeling deeply shaken, but unable to post even the blandest reference to the event on my wall. All of my straight friends did, but I was too scared that people would see that and somehow guess that my pain and shock were due to a deeper connection than just caring about the assassination of a human rights activist.

A few years on, my Facebook wall is currently a bright shade of rainbow. Covered in photos from gay pride last weekend, articles about LGBT activism all around the world, congratulatory messages to my Irish, American friends and many, many pictures of my girlfriend and I, looking stupidly in love and very happy. I estimate it takes about 1.4 seconds to realise the profile you are looking at is that of a proud lesbian, even if you have never heard the word lesbian before. So I try to stick to my rules and make my privacy settings stricter at every opportunity.

But whenever I leave a country, my former team figures out that the “rule” doesn’t apply anymore and I’m inundated with friend requests. And that’s when the debate starts in my head. Do I accept or ignore? Will this person, who until a few weeks ago respected me and considered me a role model, be disgusted to find out that I have a girlfriend? Will they write me insulting messages or worse, post biblical references on my wall? Will they stop believing in everything we have built together as a team in the past year or two?

I have ignored a few people, but in the vast majority of cases I have accepted friend requests and I have never regretted it. V., my former mentor from the Kampala days, emailed me shortly after I started seeing my current girlfriend to tell me how happy she was that I had found love. .

I’m sure there are a few shocked ones out there, but mostly there are a lot of new “likes” under photos of me and my girlfriend. Best of all, a (straight) friend of mine in Uganda keeps re– posting LGBT rights news and hopefully others in the Middle East are thinking about what it means to be gay for the first time. In the end, Facebook has become for me an easy, powerful and less confrontational way of coming out to all the people I care about, but I’m too scared to tell face to face.

So why did I ask my girlfriend to change her profile picture yesterday, to something that did not include me and a sign saying “love is love”? Why did I spend an hour at work deleting twitter posts and fiddling with my username? The answer is simple: I’m waiting for a visa, for my next technical support visit. A visa for a country where homosexuality is not only illegal, but carries the death penalty. I’m pretty sure the visa authorities will be a little suspicious of my job title, which includes the word “equality”, and I’m pretty sure they will at least google my name. As they do that, they will find my innumerable online identities which have mushroomed since the simple days of Facebook. They will see my twitter account and see my posts on women’s rights and LGBTQI issues (well, not anymore), my Airbnb reviews where my “friend” Elisabeth is regularly mentioned, my signature under petitions to stop the Anti-homosexuality Bill in Uganda. Hopefully their technology is not advanced enough to track down my old online dating profile.

And so it goes again, taking a small step back into the closet, towards the fear I had back then the day David was killed. I am now surrounded by loving people who accept me for who I am and that group keeps growing wherever I go, but I better not forget, in the dazzle of online opportunities to connect, share and meet, that I am still unwanted.

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